It's the time of year to give away crap you don't want to people who most likely don't want it either.

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Goodwill's mission is to strive to enhance the dignity and quality of life of individuals and families by strengthening communities, eliminating barriers to opportunity, and helping people in need reach their full potential through learning and the power of work.

Keep that in mind when donating to them; they are not, in fact, an alternative to a landfill.

Obviously, your life-size statue of Tom Selleck made out of bubble gum and ear wax is a nonstarter, but there may be some commonplace items that are not allowed that you may not know about.

Let's take a look at what Goodwill will and won't accept before you haul your stuff there in the hopes of feeling good about helping others.

According to their website, they will accept the following:

  • Accessories: Shoes, belts, scarves, jewelry
  • Antiques and collectibles: Specialty items can be offered through our online auction site, Shopgoodwill.com.
  • Artificial Christmas Trees
  • Clothing: All sizes, styles, and conditions. Clothing not suitable for resale can be recycled.
  • Computers: Bring computers and computer-related peripherals to any Goodwill store or donation bin. Newer computers and laptops that are in good working order may be re-sold in our Iowa City store. Click here for more information about computer donations. Non-working computers and monitors will be accepted and recycled. There is no fee to drop off those items at Goodwill.
  • Electronics (EXCEPT for televisions): Consumer electronics in good working condition. This includes alarm clocks, radios, stereo equipment, etc., but not televisions.
  • Home Decor: Portraits/frames, candles, fake florals, vases, and baskets
  • Housewares: Dishes and glassware, fans, lamps, furniture: in good condition and without heavy stains. Please see the list of furniture and household items we WILL NOT accept below.
  • Media: Books, CDs, cassettes, videos, DVDs
  • Sporting goods: Such as balls, baseball bats, rackets, cleats, etc.
  • Toys: Stuffed animals, dolls, games, and puzzles

And here's what they won't accept:

  • Any item needing repair, except computers
  • Ammunition, weapons, including replicas
  • Automotive parts, including tires, batteries, and motors
  • Baby gear, including furniture, car seats, strollers, high chairs, etc.
  • Box springs and mattresses
  • Bowling balls
  • Building materials: glass, doors, window frames, scrap lumber, metal, etc.
  • Exercise Equipment
  • Fireworks
  • Hazardous materials, including liquid cleaners, paints, detergents, fertilizers, weed killers, chemicals, motor oil, etc.
  • Helmets (bicycle, motorcycle, etc.)
  • Industrial copiers
  • Large appliances, including refrigerators, stoves, washing machines, dryers, air conditioners, humidifiers/dehumidifiers, microwaves, dishwashers, trash compactors, console stereos, water heaters, space heaters, and fireplaces
  • Large metal desks and other office equipment
  • Lawn mowers
  • Miscellaneous outdoor equipment and grills
  • Pianos (Acoustic) and Organs
  • Plumbing fixtures: sinks, shower stalls, toilets
  • Sleeper furniture, hide-a-beds
  • Televisions of any kind
  • Waterbeds
  • Wheelchairs
  • Worn furniture of any kind in poor condition or with any stains

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